Skip Nav

Tips on Writing a Persuasive Essay

Don't have an Account?

❶The middle paragraphs of the essay are collectively known as the body paragraphs and, as alluded to above, the main purpose of a body paragraph is to spell out in detail the examples that support your thesis.

Scholarships, Financial Aid, Student Loans and Colleges

Brainstorm ideas in response to the question
The Five Paragraph Essay
Step One: Choose a Fresh Topic

Read the essay question carefully Highlight key words. Use the dictionary to check the meaning of any unfamiliar words. Finish any necessary reading or research as background to the essay Be selective: Write notes in your own words. Write down quotations that may be particularly useful, but ensure the source of these quotes is acknowledged if they're used. Take note of sources so they can be provided in footnotes and the bibliography.

Brainstorm ideas in response to the question Jot down any relevant points. Make note of any relevant evidence or quotes that come to mind. Use a mind map to help stimulate lateral thinking. Avoid a thesis that's too simplistic — show thought has been put into some of the complexities behind the question. The thesis is the backbone of the essay — it will be stated in the introduction. It also needs to be referred to several times in the essay before restating it and demonstrating how it has been proven in the conclusion.

Write a plan for the response Order ideas in a logical sequence. Try instead to be more general and you will have your reader hooked. The middle paragraphs of the essay are collectively known as the body paragraphs and, as alluded to above, the main purpose of a body paragraph is to spell out in detail the examples that support your thesis.

For the first body paragraph you should use your strongest argument or most significant example unless some other more obvious beginning point as in the case of chronological explanations is required.

The first sentence of this paragraph should be the topic sentence of the paragraph that directly relates to the examples listed in the mini-outline of introductory paragraph.

A one sentence body paragraph that simply cites the example of "George Washington" or "LeBron James" is not enough, however. No, following this an effective essay will follow up on this topic sentence by explaining to the reader, in detail, who or what an example is and, more importantly, why that example is relevant. Even the most famous examples need context. The reader needs to know this and it is your job as the writer to paint the appropriate picture for them. To do this, it is a good idea to provide the reader with five or six relevant facts about the life in general or event in particular you believe most clearly illustrates your point.

Having done that, you then need to explain exactly why this example proves your thesis. The importance of this step cannot be understated although it clearly can be underlined ; this is, after all, the whole reason you are providing the example in the first place. Seal the deal by directly stating why this example is relevant. The first sentence — the topic sentence - of your body paragraphs needs to have a lot individual pieces to be truly effective. Not only should it open with a transition that signals the change from one idea to the next but also it should ideally also have a common thread which ties all of the body paragraphs together.

For example, if you used "first" in the first body paragraph then you should used "secondly" in the second or "on the one hand" and "on the other hand" accordingly.

Examples should be relevant to the thesis and so should the explanatory details you provide for them. It can be hard to summarize the full richness of a given example in just a few lines so make them count.

If you are trying to explain why George Washington is a great example of a strong leader, for instance, his childhood adventure with the cherry tree though interesting in another essay should probably be skipped over.

You may have noticed that, though the above paragraph aligns pretty closely with the provided outline, there is one large exception: These words are example of a transitional phrase — others include "furthermore," "moreover," but also "by contrast" and "on the other hand" — and are the hallmark of good writing. Transitional phrases are useful for showing the reader where one section ends and another begins. It may be helpful to see them as the written equivalent of the kinds of spoken cues used in formal speeches that signal the end of one set of ideas and the beginning of another.

In essence, they lead the reader from one section of the paragraph of another. Hopefully this example not only provides another example of an effective body paragraph but also illustrates how transitional phrases can be used to distinguish between them.

Although the conclusion paragraph comes at the end of your essay it should not be seen as an afterthought. As the final paragraph is represents your last chance to make your case and, as such, should follow an extremely rigid format. One way to think of the conclusion is, paradoxically, as a second introduction because it does in fact contain many of the same features.

Set up your working environment so that you don't have any distractions during this time and allow yourself to write freely. Make sure you have all your material nearby when you start to write.

Getting up to fetch a book or a piece of paper or a snack will eat into your precious time. Write a catchy introduction. The introduction does exactly what the word says: This tells the reader the point your trying to make in the essay. End by stating how you will demonstrate your points.

Write the body of the essay. The body of your essay will contain the substantive points that support your thesis statement or argument. Analyzing two to three main points will strengthen your argument and add more words to your overall total.

Going off on explanatory tangents will cost you precious time. Support your main points with the evidence compiled during your research. Make sure to explain how the evidence supports your claims! Write as clearly as possible.

Text that includes long prepositional phrases, passive verbs, and paragraphs that don't further your argument waste time that you could spend writing or revising your essay. Write the essay conclusion. Like the introduction, the conclusion does exactly what the word implies: It provides a summary of your basic argument and should leave the reader with a strong impression of your work.

Aim to do more in your conclusion than just restate your thesis and the evidence you used. You could acknowledge the limitations of your argument, suggest a direction for future research, or expand the relevance of your topic to a wider field. Just as you drew in reader with good introduction, end your conclusion with a sentence that make a lasting impression on your reader. Revise and proofread your essay.

No essay is good when it contains mistakes. Re-read the entire essay. Make sure that you are still arguing the same thing at the end of the essay that you are at the beginning. If not, go back and adjust your thesis. You can use transitions and strong topic sentences to help you draw connections between your paragraphs. Even though you may only have a few hours to write this essay, taking a few moments at the beginning to develop a quick plan will help you perform at your best.

Read the prompt carefully! If the question asks you to take a position, take one. However, having an idea of the main points that you want to touch on and how they relate will help you structure the essay. Even timed essays need a unified argument or thesis. Time your writing strategically. If you must answer more than one essay question during a time period, make sure that you leave yourself enough time to write all of them.

If you see a question that you feel will be more difficult for you, it could be a good idea to tackle it first. All too often, students will write their way into their ideas after spending a whole paragraph on meaningless generalizations. Particularly in timed essays, it is very important to get directly to your main argument and providing evidence for it.

Spending too much time on the introduction can leave you with less time to write later. Explain connections between evidence and claims. A common issue with essays, especially those produced under pressure, is that student writers often present evidence without explaining how it links back to their claims. This is the main argument of the paragraph. It is probably located in your topic sentence. This is the supporting detail that proves your claim. This connects the evidence back to your claim and explains why the evidence proves what you say it does.

Leave time to revise. Even in timed situations, you will want to leave some time to revise.

Step Two: Collect Information and Learn about the Right Structure

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

Guide: How to Write a Good Essay. Essay writing is one of the basic skills at school, college and university. No matter how you try to reduce the amount writing you must do for your essay, you will have to master the method for your assignment.

Privacy FAQs

Several students try to avoid writing essays in their school or college time. However it’s an important part of the educational program. As there is lot of burden of other academic, students sometimes neglect essay writing. There are various steps and services on how to become a good essay writer. Consider the following steps to become a.

About Our Ads

Sep 13,  · Do you sometimes struggle to begin writing an essay when taking an exam? Good news! There is an important writing skill that will help you improve your essay fashionlosdaeroh.cf: Learn English with Emma [engVid]. Articles about Writing; Tips on Writing a Persuasive Essay; Parents, does your student need assistance with writing a persuasive essay? Our teachers can help. Persuasive essays require good research, awareness of the reader’s biases, and a solid understanding of both sides of the issue. A good persuasive essay demonstrates not only why.

Cookie Info